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Worldwide Disclosure – Time running out

Cessation of Worldwide Disclosure Facility
Tax payers have a few weeks left to take advantage of The Worldwide Disclosure facility. The Worldwide Disclosure, which opened in September 2016 is closing from 30 September 2018. The disclosure dealt with income and gains which have an offshore element in them.

From 30 September 2018, there will be new legislation to replace the Worldwide Disclosure, called “Requirement to Correct”.  Individuals disclosing undeclared income and gains will subject to harsher penalties under this regime.

The Financial Secretary to the Treasury, Mel Stride MP, said:

Since 2010 we have secured over £2.8bn for our vital public services by tackling offshore tax evaders, and we will continue to relentlessly crack down on those not playing by the rules.This new measure will place higher penalties on those who do not contact HMRC and ensure their offshore tax liabilities are correct. I urge anyone affected to get in touch with HMRC now.

HMRC have stated:

“From 1 October more than 100 countries, including the UK, will be able to exchange data on financial accounts under the Common Reporting Standard (CRS). CRS data will significantly enhance HMRC’s ability to detect offshore non-compliance and it is in taxpayers’ interests to correct any non-compliance before that data is received.”

Worldwide Disclosure Facility is used mostly for foreign income and property. HMRC have stated that “over 17,000 people have already contacted HMRC to notify the department about tax due from sources of foreign income, such as their holiday homes and overseas properties.”

HMRC have provided examples of what could be construed as offshore assets : art and antiques; bank and other savings accounts; boats; cash; debts owed to you; gold and silver articles; government securities; jewellery; land and buildings, including holiday timeshare; life assurance policies […]

By ||Budget, Car benefits, Disclosure, IR35, Law, Small business, Tax Summaries, Uncategorized, VAT|Comments Off on Worldwide Disclosure – Time running out

IR35 and Public Authorities

IR35 for public authorities

HMRC have issued revised guidelines on who falls within the remit of a public authority under IR35. The changes apply from April 2017 and relate to whether the legislation applies to one off payroll contracts.
The guidance can be found below:

www.gov.uk/guidance/off-payroll-working-in-the-public-sector-reform-of-intermediaries-legislation

Public authorities need to decide whether the off payroll working rules apply and the conditions have been met. They will need to deduct income tax and nation insurance contributions if the worker is paid directly, or advise the agency if the off payroll working rules apply before the contract or work starts.

The definition of a public authority includes government departments,agencies and local authorities, companies controlled or owned by the public sector, schools and universities and the National Health Service.

Where a public authority has fully contracted out services to a third party and the workers do not personally provide their services to the public authority, then the rules would not apply.

A Managed Service Company (MSC) is a form of intermediary company through which workers provide their services to end clients. The worker doesn’t exercise control over the company.
If the worker is providing their services to a public authority through an MSC, the off-payroll working in the public sector rules will apply.

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Rangers EBT case : Press Release by CIOT

Supreme Court takes a strong stance on the Rangers EBT case
HMRC is likely to issue follower notices to employee benefit trusts (EBTs) currently under enquiry, where the circumstances match those in the Supreme Court’s decision in the Rangers case, says the CIOT.

www.tax.org.uk/media-centre/press-releases/press-release-supreme-court-take-tough-line-rangers-‘landmark-tax-case’
The Supreme Court has decided1 that tax planning undertaken by Rangers Football Club2 involving an Employee Benefit Trust (EBT) did not succeed in avoiding employment income tax and National Insurance Contributions on amounts paid to the EBT for players and executives. This followed successes by the Club in the First Tier and Upper Tier Tribunals but a reversal in the Court of Session.
Lord Hodge, delivering the judgement of the Court, said that the appeal raised a “fundamental question about the nature of the income tax charge on employment income” but he was ultimately very clear in his view that “the sums paid to the trustee of the Principal Trust for a footballer constituted the footballer’s emoluments or earnings”.
Colin Ben-Nathan, Chair of the CIOT’s Employment Taxes sub-Committee, said:

“We understand that HMRC have a large number of enquiries ongoing into EBTs at the moment and they will therefore feel vindicated by this decision.
“Whilst many employers have already settled with HMRC, for those that have not it is likely that HMRC will now issue “follower notices”3 where they consider that the circumstances sit on all fours with Rangers. These notices will require employers to pay up the tax or face a penalty if they fight on but lose in the courts, neither of which choices will be particularly appealing after the Rangers decision.”

He added that:

“This judgement demonstrates that the courts are taking an increasingly tough line on tax avoidance, adopting a purposive approach and certainly not considering […]

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Budget 2017

A SIMPLE GUIDE TO THE BUDGET 2017
This is a basic guide to the Budget 2017.  It is an introduction only and should not be used as a definitive guide, since individual circumstances may vary. Specific advice should be obtained, where necessary.

A stronger, fairer, better Britain were the themes of the Budget. You can read the individual measures below.

Marriage allowance
This applies from 6 April and allows for the transfer of £1,150 of a personal allowance to a spouse or partner.

Self-employed National Insurance Contribution
The main rate of Class 4 NIC’s will increase (from the current rate of 9%) to 10% from April 2018 and to 11% from April 2019.

Dividend Allowance
The tax-free dividend allowance was introduced from April 2016 so that the first £5,000 of dividend income would be tax free.

The tax-free dividend allowance will be reduced from £5,000 to £2,000 from April 2018.

Corporation tax
The corporation tax rate will be reduced from 20% to 19% for the 2017/18 tax year and to 17% by 2020.

Annual Investment Allowance
The annual investment allowance of £200,000 per annum remains available for companies and for unincorporated businesses.

Making tax digital
Rollout beginning April 2018; however for unincorporated businesses with a turnover below the VAT registration threshold there would be a delay of one year to the introduction of quarterly reporting.

UK Deemed Domicile
Individuals who are not domiciled in the UK will be deemed to be UK domiciled for tax purposes if they are either resident in the UK for 15 of the past 20 tax years, or if they are born in the UK with a UK domicile of origin and return to the UK having obtained a domicile of choice elsewhere

VAT

2016/17           2017/18
Standard rate               […]

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Negligent director and national insurance

National insurance contribution reversal for an alleged negligent director
FIRST TIER TRIBUNAL CASE
ANTHONY PETER BROUGHTON-HEAD Appellant
– and –
THE COMMISSIONERS FOR HMRC Respondents
The Tribunal determined the appeal on 6 February 2017

Abstract:

Negligent director – balancing of evidence – accruing national insurance years for pension purposes – reinstating contribution years.

Introduction:

Mr Broughton-Head appealed against the decision of HMRC in relation to the payment or non-payment of Class 1 National Insurance Contributions (NICs) between 1985 and 1991. The appeal related to the tax years 1986 to 1989 as they were important to the appellant in respect of his pension.

The appeal was against a decision which stated the the taxpayer had paid nil national insurance contributions during the tax years 1985 to 1991 and he was accused of being a negligent director.

Background:

The Social Security (Contributions) Regulations 1979 makes provision for the treatment for the purposes of contributory benefit of late paid or
unpaid Class 1 contributions. Where the late payment or failure in making payment is shown not to be attributable to the negligence on the part of the primary contributor, the primary contribution is to be treated as duly paid.

The appeal was against the previous decision that the appellant was a negligent director. He was the director of a company called Broughton- Head Timber Ltd (Timber), which was wound up on 19 January 1994.

The Insolvency Section of HMRC investigated matters and concluded that he was a negligent director and that no contributions had been paid for the tax years 1986/87, 1987/88 and 1988/89. The appellant’s contributions for those tax years were removed from his record. Case details regarding the contributions were not available.

The appellant requested HMRC in September 2014 to reverse the removal of the contributions from his national insurance records, which HMRC refused to […]

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An Overview of Inheritance Tax

When planning out their estates, many people forget about inheritance tax. They bequeath their belongings to their loved ones, and they don’t think about their heirs having to pay that inheritance tax on both property and money that is inherited. Even less people think about it these days because it’s not been in the headlines recently.

It is important to understand that just because the UK has this inheritance tax doesn’t mean that certain groups of people aren’t exempt. That is why it’s important to know the specific laws that surround this type of tax. Currently the inheritance tax threshold is £325,000 per person or £650,000 for a married couple. This is only valid if the first person to die leaves their entire estate to their partner. Everything over this is subject to a 40% levy.

Inheritance tax needs to paid within 6 months of the person dying otherwise there will be interest to pay on the estate. Most people don’t realise that you can pay inheritance tax over 10 years on things that are difficult to sell such as houses and certain types of shares.

If you aren’t sure if the inheritance tax applies to you or your beneficiaries, then it’s time to find out. For starters, there are things that people can do to keep those inheritance taxes out of play. Yes, that’s right, you can take care of it all beforehand so that heirs aren’t having to pay extra taxes.

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National Insurance Contributions In The UK

What are National Insurance contributions in the United Kingdom and who has to pay them? How do taxpayers pay it? How much do they have to pay?

1. What Are They- National Insurance contributions are paid by people. They pay them in order to qualify for various benefits, such as State Pension. Some other benefits include a state pension, maternity allowance and bereavement benefits.

2. Who Makes The Contributions – National Insurance are payable by employees, employers and the self employed. For example, if you are an employee who earns more £155 per week,  you may be liable. If you are self employed and your net profits were £5,965 or more in a tax year, you may have to pay them. UK citizens and residents need to have a National Insurance number before they can make contributions.

3. How Much Do You Pay- There are various factors that play a role in how much is payable towards National Insurance. Generally, the amount payable will depend on your profits if you are self employed. For the employed, the national insurance contributions depends on the pay . Rates may change when the tax year changes.

People who tend to pay less include those who are a widow or a married woman with a certificate of election. Having a valid a valid small earnings exemption may result in less national insurance.  People also pay less if they have more than one job.

Aside from the above, there are  a number of National Insurance rules. These include directors of a company, as well as landlords who run a property business. If you fall into either of these categories then you may want to consult a small business accountant who has specialised knowledge in these […]

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The Services That Are Provided By An Accountant

The job of an accountant is to keep track of numbers that primarily are the result of business activity. Keeping track of day to day transactions such as sales, inventory, discounts, taxes and the like can get very detailed and if not recorded and made into some kind of sense, could cause a business to fail for lack of proper information.

In addition staying up to date on the value of assets, or that which is owned by a company, and liabilities, or that which is owed by a company is also very valuable information.

Nowadays the day to day transactions are usually captured by computer with point of sale devices in a retail operation and by invoices in various other businesses. The computer then compiles the data that is received into reports that tells the business owner how well the business is doing , is not doing, and from that information accurate business decisions can be made.

Taxes must be paid too, such as payroll taxes for employees which must be withheld from employee’s wages and sent to the government.  Income taxes also have to be paid by the business on its taxable profits.

The overall health of a business entity is determined on a daily basis, and the job of the accountant is to keep track of all of the financial transactions so trends can be established. If the trends are good, they can be continued, but if they are bad, appropriate changes can be instituted. Without proper accounting procedures, a business could be in deep trouble and not even know it.

Proper accounting is really the measure of whether the business is operating in a healthy manner, or whether there are problems. A good accounting system, run […]

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Self Assessment & PAYE tax gap narrows

Self assessment & PAYE tax gap narrows
The UK’s tax gap, which is the difference between tax collected by HMRC through self assessment, disclosure schemes and tax investigations and the amount of tax owed has narrowed to 6.4%. This is welcoming news for both the Treasury and the economy as a whole. Much of the gap will relate to avoidance and evasion.

Despite this fall, from 6.6% in 2012/2013, there is still a staggering £34bn to be collected, showing there is still much to be done, says ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants).

Chas Roy-Chowdhury, ACCA head of taxation, stated:

“It is a huge credit to the staff at HMRC that they have managed to lower the tax gap despite constant cuts to their budget. However with £34bn still uncollected, and the government struggling to meet its borrowing target the Chancellor should reconsider his decision to cut HMRC’s resources.

Corporate tax avoidance may be falling but there is still a sizeable amount lost due to innocent mistakes and evasion. It is in these areas where more resources for HMRC could be best deployed. In helping guide those who want to pay the right amount of tax and in investigating those who are determined not to pay tax.

We should also remember that these figures include £1bn collected from accelerated payment notices. Those are a one off catch-up from historic schemes that won’t be repeated – and there is always the risk that even some of those amounts will have to be returned, as taxpayers are challenging HMRC’s approach in this area.”

Pension Relief – availing the opportunity

Pension Relief – availing the opportunity
Although the government has announced that pension relief will be reduced from April 2016, there is still a window of opportunity to utilise any unused relief’s from the last three years.

Pension relief  is the amount that can be paid into a pension fund in any single year tax free. It currently stands at £40,000, however from April 2016 that will fall to £30,000 for everyone. Tax payers who pay income tax at 45% will find this pension relief amount even lower. However, what some people may not realise is that unused contributions from the last three years can be carried forward.

Chas Roy-Chowdhury, ACCA head of taxation, said: ‘£40,000 or even £30,000 may sound like a lot of money to pay into a pension fund but that includes both employer and employee contributions, and for anyone with more than one pension fund it is the total amount spread over the multiple schemes.”

“It is very disappointing the government has chosen to reduce the amount people can save tax free for their retirement. It is another blow to creating a nation of savers – as the Chancellor and Prime Minister pledged to do after being elected in 2010. I would urge everyone that is able to use their full allowance every year, to check whether they have unused allowance from previous years. If you are unsure check with your pension provider, they will be happy to provide you with a statement of contributions for each year.”

“Those hit hardest, again, will be those just entering the workplace. Not only will they have a reduced yearly allowance but also a reduced lifetime allowance. The government seems to be targeting younger workers and making it more […]

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